Stormwater

Overview
Stormwater is a term used to describe water that originates during precipitation events with snow melt or runoff water from over watering that enters the stormwater system. Stormwater that does not enter the ground becomes surface runoff that either flows into waterways or is channeled into storm drains.

Stormwater is a concern for 2 main reasons: 1 related to the volume and timing of runoff water (flood control and water supplies) and the other related to potential contaminants the water is carrying.

Resources
The following information and resources are available on stormwater: Stormwater Flood Conditions
Enteric Bacteria such as Fecal Coliform, E-Coli and Enterococci normally inhabit the intestinal tract of humans and animals, and may cause human illness, infections or rashes. The presence of Enteric Bacteria is an indication of Fecal pollution, which may come from flooding, stormwater runoff, pets and wild life, birds and wastewater.

If high concentrations of these organisms are ingested or enter through an open cut or sore, they may cause human illness or infection. The most common symptoms include rash, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting.

People are advised not to gather in areas where there may be slow-moving waterways for several days after heavy rain or while water is still standing.